What is a “morning message”?

Morning MessagesThe morning message is a daily letter written from the teacher/s to students highlighting one or more elements of the day ahead. These messages are written before students arrive at school. As students enter the classroom, among the first things they do are to visit and read (or attempt to read) the morning message. In early grades, morning messages are read chorally aloud as students gain familiarity with words/phrases that show up often in the letters. In older grades, students read the morning message independently, and often respond in some way as well. Responses might involve writing a word or phrase in response to a question, solving a mathematical problem posed, or adding information to create a chart or graph of class data. Morning messages provide an anchor for each classroom community to generate excitement around learning for the day, kick-start morning routines, and practice critical learning skills across the curriculum. Teachers can use morning messages to assess where each student needs additional enrichment or support and build confidence of their learners prior to new and challenging skills and concepts that might lie ahead in the school day. Morning messages build community in developmentally appropriate ways at each grade level. Morning messages are a small component of each child’s day (approximately 5 minutes), yet with over 170 school days in the year they are a repeated opportunity for practicing critical learning and demonstrating quality growth.

Maintaining Gains

Here you will find a compendium of suggested resources to maintain academic progress made during the school year for elementary aged children.The PDF includes resources for:

  • Math Apps
  • Math Fact Practice Websites & Games
  • Links to Book Recommendation Lists for Elementary Students
  • Spelling, Phonics, and Reading Apps
  • Writing Apps
  • Journal Prompt Books & Websites
  • Parent Recommendations (books, websites, & articles)

At Tuxedo Park School we value a developmentally appropriate approach to summer work that balances enjoyment of the slower pace of summer with consistent exposure to topics covered and skills mastered. These resources are not assignments, but possibilities as families craft the summer schedules and routines that are right for their child.